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Vaccinations

Getting the recommended travel vaccinations and following the general health advice given in this booklet will help you stay healthy when abroad. 

The DIT Student Health Centre runs a Travel Vaccination Clinic - for more details on clinic times and charges please refer to the fees page in 'About Us'.

When should I find out about vaccinations?

Vaccinations will need to be arranged several weeks before travel, so contact your doctor or vaccination centre at least 6 weeks before travelling.

If you are planning a long-term trip abroad, a trip where there is a high risk of becoming ill, such as trekking or taking children abroad, you should contact your doctor or vaccination centre 6 months before travelling.

Do I have to pay for vaccinations?

Yes.  The Medical Card Scheme or the Drugs Payment Scheme does not cover travel vaccinations and tablets.

You will have to pay for:

  • The vaccinations or tablets you need.

  • A vaccination administering charge of €10.

  • A €30 charge for a consultation regarding Travel Vaccines in the DIT Health Centre.

Do I need travel vaccinations when travelling within the European Union?

Travel vaccinations are not compulsory for travel in or between European Union centres. Vaccinations may be recommended for travel to some countries, particularly those in Eastern Europe.

Do I need travel vaccinations when travelling to countries outside of the European Union?

This will depend on where you are travelling. You doctor or vaccination centre will advice you on the health risks of the individual country or countries you are visiting. In general if you are travelling to countries other than Western Europe, North America, Australia or New Zealand, travel vaccinations will be recommended.

For individual countries some vaccinations may be compulsory (you must have them).

Check with your doctor or vaccination centre if you need a current International Vaccination Certificate.

What travel vaccinations are available?

Vaccinations such as Diphtheria, Tetanus, Polio, BCG (which protects against Tuberculosis or T.B) and Meningitis C are part of the childhood vaccination programme in Ireland.

  • Check that you are up to date with these vaccinations before you travel.

  • Check with your doctor if you need a ‘booster’ (extra) vaccination before travelling.

  • Keep a written record of all your vaccinations.  If you travel regularly you may need ‘booster’ vaccinations – some vaccinations only protect for a specific length of time.

Specific travel Vaccinations

Yellow Fever

Yellow fever is a viral infection spread by mosquitoes. It is common in areas of Africa around the equator and in areas of South America.

Typhoid

Typhoid is a bacterial infection of the intestine, which causes diarrhoea, vomiting and fever.  It is important to follow the general health advice for preventing diarrhoea above.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a viral infection, which is common in many countries.  It is important to follow the general health advice for preventing diarrhoea above.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a viral infection, which is spread by contact with body fluids such as blood, semen and vaginal fluids.  It is important to follow the general health advice for preventing Sexually Transmitted Infections above.

Meningococcal Vaccines

Meningococcal meningitis is a bacterial infection caused by different groups of the Meningococcal bacteria.  Vaccination against various groups is available, check with your doctor.

Tick borne Encephalitis

This is a viral infection spread by ticks usually in spring to early autumn.  Clothing that covers as much skin as possible and using insect repellent are also important.

Japanese Encephalitis

This is viral infection, which is spread by mosquitoes. It occurs widely in South East Asia, particularly during the monsoon season.

And finally enjoy your holidays...