DIT Cost of Living Guide

 The following is a guide to the cost of living for a student in Ireland for 2018/19 

Student’s Living Away From Home

Monthly (€)

Annual (€)

Rent (National – for Dublin see below)

430*

3,870

Utilities

35

315

Food

169

1,521

Travel

135**

1,215

Books  & Class materials

71***

639

Clothes/Medical

40

360

Mobile

25****

225

Social life/Misc

76

684

Student Charge

333

3,000

Total’s

1,314

11,829

  

Students Living At Home

Monthly (€)

Annual (€)

Contribution to Utilities

29

261

Food

60

540

Travel

135

1,215

Books & Class Materials

56

504

Clothes/Medical

44

396

Mobile

25

225

Social Life/Misc

71

639

Student Charge

333

3,000

Total’s

753

6,780

 

Sources used to produce the DIT Student Cost of Living Guide included the Daft.ie rental report Q1, 2018, Consumer price index March 2018, HEA Eurostudent V (2016), Money Guide Ireland (2018). If referencing the Student Cost of Living Guide please cite DIT Campus Life

On average 40% of students receive Higher Education grants, and their Student Contribution charge will be paid by SUSI.

* The rent figure is the mean of National City regions single rent a room cost.  The above guide is a national guide, and the average rental figure for students in Dublin is higher at around €541 Rent in Dublin can vary widely from less than €483 per month for a shared room, up to €1,784 or more for a one bedroom unit in Dublin 2. (€541 Figure mean of Dublin region single rent a room cost).

** The travel cost is taking on the capped student LEAP fare which has remained at €30/week on average month of 4.5 weeks.

*** Class materials and equipment cost can vary greatly, particularly for students in Arts, Sciences and Catering. For more detailed information you should contact your programme co-coordinator.

**** Taken from the Money Guide Ireland (http://www.moneyguideireland.com/cheapest-mobile-phone-charges.html): “In 2016 the average spend per mobile customer in Ireland was €25.10 a month or €301 a year. Pre-paid mobile phone customers in Ireland spent half as much as bill pay customers – with average monthly prepay charges of €15.44 compared to a €34.94 monthly average for bill pay mobile customers.” 

Find out more information on student finance and budgeting at www.studentfinance.ie and www.consumerhelp.ie. To get detailed information on rental costs in your search area, the PRTB have launched the national rent index more detail can be found at www.prtb.ie.

Tips for managing your finances

  • Make a budget. The most important thing is to make a budget for yourself. First work out your income from Maintenance Grant (if any); part-time work; allowance from your parents. Then work out your expenditure. Allocate money for essentials like rent and food first. MABS, the Money and Budgeting Service have a good budget calculator and other helpful tips.
  • Know your entitlements.  The excellent website www.studentfinance.ie lists all the different types of financial assistance available for students going into third-level.  Also check if you’re eligible for and sports scholarships or Irish language scholarships as well.
  • Choose your accommodation wisely. Despite the decreases this year, accommodation still takes up over a third of the student budget.  The above guide is based on a national survey, and the average rental figure for students in Dublin is around €340. Rent in Dublin can vary widely from less than €250 per month if you're willing to share a room, up to €600 or more if you want luxury. Getting accommodation near college can save you a fortune on transport and food, but make sure it's safe and clean. For more information see the DIT accommodation website. Check the DITSU website for a checklist on what to look for.
  • Shop around! Use the web to get the best deals for mobile phones (www.callcosts.ie ) and groceries (www.consumerconnect.ie ).
  • Part-time work. Last year 40% of DIT students had part-time work (down from over 60% in 2008), and work will still be difficult to obtain this year. Studies show that if you work over 15 hours per week it can have a detrimental effect on your studies.  Also, do not timetable work during class hours – missing lectures and labs is a sure way to fail your course.
  • Avoid the debt trap. Credit cards might seem like easy money, but if you don’t pay off the full amount every month, the interest can pile up very quickly. The Financial Regulator has some tips for starting college here.
  • Mature Students.  Generally mature students will find that they have more expenses than traditional aged students.  For specific information about financial support for mature students, see the Finance Information pages from the Mature Student Support Office.
  • Most importantly - if you get into financial difficulty, don't suffer in silence.  Talk to anyone in the Students' Union or the Chaplaincy and they can put you in contact with the office the administers the Student assistance Fund.

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