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EU Kids Online

Research Network Coordinated by: London School of Economics (LSE)
European Research on Cultural, Contextual and Risk Issues in Children's Safe Use of the Internet and New Media

 

The National Centre for Technology in Education (NCTE) and the DIT Centre for Social & Educational Research are working together under the leadership of the London School of Economics in a pan-European research initiative investigating how children and young people use the internet and new media. Together we will evaluate the social, cultural and regulatory influences affecting both the risks of new media and also children’s and parents’ responses to them.

The EU Kids Online project examines research carried out in 21 member states into how people, especially children and young people, use new media. In this three-year collaboration, researchers across a diverse range of countries will collaborate, through meetings, networking and dissemination activities, to identify, compare and evaluate the available evidence.

Key questions include:

  • What research exists, is ongoing or, crucially, is still needed?
  • What risks exist, for which technologies, and in relation to which (sub)populations?
  • How do social, cultural and regulatory influences affect the incidence and experience of, and the responses to, different risks?
  • Further, in accounting for current and ongoing research, and anticipating future research, what factors shape the research capability of European research institutions and networks?

The aim is to identify comparable research findings across member states on the basis of which recommendations for child safety, media literacy and awareness can be formulated. The project members invite communications from the wider community, practitioners and researchers in order to achieve this goal.

The IRELAND team is based in the Centre for Social & Educational Research and at the National Centre for Technology in Education, Dublin. To find out more about the Irish team, click here.