Motivated Self-Starter

Motivated self-starters are creative, decisive, resourceful, and take the initiative. They have a “can-do” attitude and pro-actively seek out opportunities for engagement.

  1. Why is this graduate attribute important?
  2. Ideas for incorporating into module or programme

[Back to Graduate Attributes Homepage]


Why is this graduate attribute important?

The trend away from routine work and from the “job-for-life” means graduates need to be motivated self-starters in order to be and to remain employable. Employers expect graduates to be adaptable, to be able to take responsibility for their own performance, and to be able to identify opportunities when they arise.

[Back to Top]


Ideas for incorporating into module or programme

Some case study ideas linking skills development to specific learning outcomes are provided below.

Enhancing quality of learning experiences of students on placement

Instead of asking students to write a report on their experiences, students out on work placement undertake a period of writing individual reflective blogs (4 x weekly blog @ 400 words per blog) to capture their experiences and reflections on experiences.

Interested in finding out more?

RAFT Case Study - Health Care

Example Learning Outcomes

  1. Reflect and communicate a critical self-awareness through use of an online blog

Collaboration and teamwork

Instead of using a lab manual, ask students to work in groups to carry out structured tasks on a weekly basis.

Interested in finding out more? RAFT Case Study - Health and Nutrition

  1. Work as part of a team to plan and complete a project
  2. Demonstrate an ability to apply lessons from previous tasks to new problems
  3. Apply theory to solve real-world problems

    Instead of asking students to write an essay or do a presentation, ask them to do a group report on a case study.

    Interested in finding out more? RAFT Case Study - Social Care

    Example Learning Outcomes

    1. Use the academic literature to help to identify practical solutions to real-world problems.

    Choose the medium for the assessment

    Students submit a reflective piece of work in a medium of their choosing.

    Interested in finding out more? RAFT toolkit - Product Design

    Example Learning Outcomes

    1. Identify areas of the course that have extended your learning and reflect on how they have changed your practice.
    2. Choose the most appropriate medium for your reflective practice.

    Self-evaluate

    Ask students to compile a portfolio of their work. Portfolios may be process portfolios, documenting the stages of learning, or product portfolios, demonstrating mastery of a set of learning objectives, and containing only the best work.

    Interested in finding out more? RAFT Case Study - Social Care

    Example Learning Outcomes

    1. Identify areas of the course that have extended your learning and reflect on how they have changed your practice.

    [Back to Top]