Resilient

Resilient graduates have the capacity to cope with and manage changing circumstances and challenges, as well as the ability to ‘bounce back’ from adversity or failure. A resilient graduate has a high level of self-awareness, is curious, persistent, optimistic and has a clear sense of personal efficacy.

  1. Why is this graduate attribute important?
  2. Ideas for incorporating into module or programme

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Why is this graduate attribute important?

Resilient graduates have the capacity to cope with and manage changing circumstances and challenges, as well as the ability to ‘bounce back’ from adversity or failure. A resilient graduate has a high level of self-awareness, is curious, persistent, optimistic and has a clear sense of personal efficacy.

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Ideas for incorporating into module or programme

Some case study ideas linking skills development to specific learning outcomes are provided below.

Self and Peer Assessment

Students are asked to mark themselves and their peers on their group participation. Students are provided with clear marking criteria and provide written feedback on their marking decisions.

Interested in finding out more? Raft Case study

Example Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students have to consider and mark their own contribution to the task and their commitment to the learning opportunity.
  2. Students feel they have more autonomy in the marking process.

Critique

The ‘Crit’ is an opportunity for students and staff to evaluate work in progress and provide formative feedback. The ‘Crit’ it allows for both positive and negative feedback and should provoke students into questioning their work helping them to develop a deeper understanding on their learning.

Interested in finding out more? Raft case study

Example Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students develop critical skills and critical thinking, including questioning.
  2. Provides students with perspective on their work in relation to their peers
  3. Students develop an understanding of giving and receiving constructive criticism in a professional environment.

Group Debate

Collaboration and teamwork through the format of a formal debate. The topic is set on an area within the programmes discipline. Students are put into teams and given a detailed brief. Formal debate rules guide the process.

Interested in finding out more? Raft case study

Example Learning Outcomes:

  1. Develops personal confidence skills and the ability to develop and present arguments
  2. Student are provided an opportunity to collaborate with peers and develop their team working skills

Learning Contracts

A learning contract is an agreement negotiated between a learner and a supervisor to ensure that certain activities will be undertaken in order to achieve an identified learning goal, specific evidence will be produced to demonstrate that goal has been reached.

Interested in finding out more? Raft case study

Example Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students have an opportunity to develop the skills of self-reflection and self-management. 
  2. Students identify their learning goals and needs thus increasing their focus on the subject.

Active learning

A Student Learning with Communities involves DIT staff and/or students collaborating with underserved community partners (local groups, not-for-profit organisations, charities etc.) to develop real-life projects for mutual benefit. Learning comes alive for the students as they work on these projects with community partners, developing professional transferable skills, and enhancing their understanding of their specialist subject skills and of the community they work with.

Interested in finding out more? RAFT case study

Example Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students have an opportunity to develop the skills of self-reflection and self-management. 
  2. Student are provided an opportunity to collaborate with peers and develop their team working skills 
  3. Students are provided an opportunity to collaborate with communities and develop their professional capacity

Quality of classroom experience

Clickers are hand-held personal response systems which enable lecturers to ask questions and gather students' responses during a lecture. Gathering responses from students during lectures has helped lecturers gauge the understanding of their students, giving them a chance to focus on areas the class is struggling with. Use of clickers can increase students' attention and interest and increase retention of information presented in lectures.

Interested in finding out more? Clickers lecturers’ feedback

  1. Students have an opportunity to assess their level of understanding of the topic
  2. Students have an opportunity to assess their strengths and weaknesses on a subject
  3. An opportunity for instant feedback

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