Strategic Thinker

Strategic thinkers are aware of the necessity to develop and innovate and have the ability to set out and prioritise long and short term goals both professionally and personally. They recognise potential and question the ‘norm’. They remain open to opportunities and maintain knowledge while constantly balancing associated risks.

  1. Why is this graduate attribute important?
  2. Ideas for incorporating into module or programme

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Why is this graduate attribute important?

To operate successfully within an everchanging economy and society, today’s graduates need to be Strategic thinkers.  To be a strategic thinker graduates need to have the ability to innovate, plan and synthesise information in a pro-active, coherent and constructive way. By acquiring and utilising the right information these graduates can develop a successful edge both personally and professionally in their chosen careers.

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Ideas for incorporating into module or programme

Some case study ideas linking skills development to specific learning outcomes are provided below.

Active learning

A Student Learning with Communities involves DIT staff and/or students collaborating with underserved community partners (local groups, not-for-profit organisations, charities etc.) to develop real-life projects for mutual benefit. Learning comes alive for the students as they work on these projects with community partners, developing professional transferable skills, and enhancing their understanding of their specialist subject skills and of the community they work with.

Interested in finding out more? RAFT case study, Science

Example Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students have an opportunity to develop the skills of self-reflection and self-management. 
  2. Student are provided an opportunity to collaborate with peers and develop their team working skills 
  3. Students are provided an opportunity to collaborate with communities and develop their professional capacity

Real-life practice

Graduates will be the future leaders in their professions. As policy is the framework for professional practice it is important that students engage with critiquing current policy and considering and developing new policy.

Interested in finding out more? RAFT case study, Social Sciences

Example Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrates the connection between policy and professional practice
  2. Students are encouraged to examine and critique current policy
  3. Students are encouraged to select a personal perspective in the delivery of their professional practice

Reports

Reports can often bring theory from the classroom to real world application. Whether through Industry projects, policy, or community and work placement, reports can integrate learning across modules and provide students with a professional confidence. By applying their knowledge they can clearly articulate to future employers their skills and expertise. They also begin to understand their own professional perspective and personal efficacy.

Interested in finding out more? Reports

Example Learning Outcomes

  1. Students engage in real world situations using their professional skills to assess or solves a problem
  2. Develops personal confidence skills and the ability to develop and present strategies
  3. Develops students ability to articulate their professional skills to employers

Industry Project

The students need to identify a change that needs to be made in the organisation that they work for and implement this change and track the affects of this.

Interested in finding out more? RAFT Case Study - Industry project

Example Learning Outcomes

  1. Students engage in real world situations using their professional skills to assess or solves a problem
  2. Students are encouraged to question and critique the structure of orgainisations
  3. Students are encourage to develop, prototype and test solutions aimed at improving orgainisational structure

Poster Project

Students must produce an A1 poster. This poster is based upon 1 of 8 components, which make up the module. The students must select which component to research and then design, produce, print and present the poster.

Interested in finding out more? RAFT Case Study - Poster Presentation

Example Learning Outcomes

  1. Students use several skills learned across other modules, which reinforces their learning. 
  2. Gives the students a sense of independence in their learning as they chose which component to research.
  3. Students are pushed to present their learning in an innovative and succinct style

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