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Signage

Any sign placed by or on behalf of a public body at any location in the State or outside the State shall be in Irish or in Irish and English.

A sign is the display of information which includes but is not limited to fixed signs, notices, information signs, exhibition stands, pull up's, directional signs, electronic signs etc.

Samples of official TU Dublin Bilingual Signage Templates are available to download and print here. These bilingual signage templates include: No Food or Drink signs; Exams in progress; Out of Order signs etc. 

Please email gaeilge@dit.ie for the Irish language translations for signage. 

All signage must adhere to the following regulations:

The text in the Irish language:

  • Shall appear first 
  • Shall not be less prominent, visible, or legible than the text in the English language
  • The lettering of the text in the Irish language shall not be smaller in size than the lettering of the text in the English language
  • Shall communicate the same information as is communicated by the text in the English language
  • A word in the text in the Irish language shall not be abbreviated unless the word in the text in the English language, of which it is the translation, is also abbreviated.

These regulations come into effect on the following dates:

  • 1 March 2009       Any new signs
  • 1 March 2012       Signs placed on any site before 1 March 2009 which would fulfill the  Regulation requirements except there is an error in the Irish text
  • 1 March 2013       Alter signs in English only
  • 1 January 2026    Alter signs where: Text in Irish is less prominent, visible or legible than the text in English & Lettering of text in Irish is smaller in size than the text in English

Two signs may be placed at a location providing the same information in Irish and in English of which the one first appearing shall bear text in the Irish language only and the other shall bear text in the English language only.

You can place separate signs in Irish and English where the public company deems the placing of one bilingual sign:

  • would be unduly big
  • would be difficult to read
  • would be likely to cause an obstruction
  • that people would, while reading it, be likely to constitute a danger to themselves or others.

Exceptions in the Regulations in relation to signs:

1. Under these Regulations, a public body is not required to translate to English the name of a public body in Irish or an official title that is in common use in Irish.

2. Under these Regulations, a public body is not required to translate from English to Irish or from Irish to English:

  • a person's name;
  • a logo;
  • a brand name;
  • the name of a body other than a public body.

There is no requirement to alter:

  • a sign that is of artistic, architectural or historical interest
  • a sign that is subject to a preservation order
  • a commemorative plaque placed or erected on or before 1 March 2009
  • a sign in respect of which there is compliance with these Regulations except that the text in English appears before the text in Irish

This does not apply to: